gentle faces

Michelangelo. The huge, fantastically muscular figures— and the gentle faces. Soulful angels and powerful men.

John Rechy, The Sexual Outlaw

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Genet’s world

Jean Genet. Dual exile. Convict and homosexual. Drag queens and superhung studs. Strength and passivity, violence and tenderness. A stud becomes a queen, a queen a stud— easily in Genet’s world.

John Rechy, The Sexual Outlaw

soulful sensualists

The law tells us we’re criminals, and so we’ve become defiant outlaws. Psychiatrists demand we be sick, and so we’ve become obsessed with physical beauty. Religion insists we’re sinners, and so we’ve become soulful sensualists. The result is the unique, sensual, feeling, elegant sensibility of the sexual outlaw.

John Rechy, The Sexual Outlaw

rainbow-colored tears

JUDY GARLAND BAPTIZED us in rainbow-colored tears. Not the fabulous performer, no, not her— but the symbol of the eternal, crushed, defeated— but-come-out-fighting— loser she became for the homosexual. Like her, he masochistically acquiesced; kick us and we’ll hurt, but we’ll come back singing for more with a sob in our voices, they said through her.

John Rechy, The Sexual Outlaw

lurking demon

Carefully, I explored my feelings, sensing a lurking demon; I found him, pushing me into that pitfall of all minorities, that we must not allow ourselves the freedom to be awful— and the implicit freedom to call whatever is awful “awful.”

John Rechy, The Sexual Outlaw

mesmerizing power

“Either I’ve gone mad or, by God’s mercy, this morning I have discovered that I am the wielder of mesmerizing power. I find I can control the flow of events around me using nothing more than words. Not that I have the least idea yet what to do. Or I have gone mad . . .”

László Krasznahorkai, Satantango

foul nest

Because what did it mean to say that something represented “a cross between primitive insensitivity and chillingly inane emptiness in a bottomless pit of unbridled dark’?! What sort of crime against language was this foul nest of mixed metaphors?!

László Krasznahorkai, Satantango

self-humiliation

Your helplessness is culpable, your cowardice culpable, culpable, ladies and gentlemen! Because — and mark this well! — it is not only other people one can ruin, but oneself! . . . And that is a graver fault, my friends, and indeed, if you think about it carefully, you will see that every sin we commit against ourselves is an act of self-humiliation.

László Krasznahorkai, Satantango